Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
MSNBCW 14
MSNBC 11
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 5
KNTV (NBC) 4
WRC (NBC) 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KGO (ABC) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
LINKTV 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 74
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
to educate families. >> they take children from a long screening, from their bmi to all their testings they need. their blood pressure, height, weight. they take them through a spirometry check. they get an asthma and action plan, they see the ator gift and pulmonologist. many times that's not something you can do all in one day. we're really trying to capture it all together. >> the children have a fair amount of basic information about asthma. they operate off of a lot of myths. >> the idea is to bring the health options and information to underdeserved communities while showing that staying healthy can be fun. >> we work out as a family. i have a mini-gym at the house. i put the kids through circuit training three times a week. >> if there's one parent who talked to me and said, i no longer have to take my child to the er. well, that's costing less for us as a plan. but it's providing this mother with the opportunity to know their child is healthy. the child, it provides them with the confidence we can do things such as play basketball or do other types of activities. >> this year's
members who want to improve their education or their careers. >>> a road trip for the jury in the murder trial of a former culpeper, virginia police officer. sky fox overhead this morning as members of the jury got a firsthand look at the crime scene. officer daniel harmon-wright is accused of shooting a woman to death last year as she sat in her car in this culpeper parking lot. prosecutors say the shooting was unjustified and that he used excessive force. the defense arks the woman didn't comply -- argues the woman didn't comply with the officer even after he warned he would shoot if necessary. >>> coming up tonight, there could be sweeping changes when it comes to school athletics. find out who says students with disabilities should be given a fair shot. >>> should high school students be forced to take a government class to graduate? why that requirement could soon become a thing of the past in d.c. d.c. >>> a landmark decision for disabled student athletes across the country. the u.s. education department has passed an order saying schools must provide sports teams to accommodate th
, a successful farmers, people who had high education. and they traveled the world and learned from other cultures. they had out -- studied government from other countries from taking and choosing from the various things and do come up with creative solutions for the issues they thought had not been resolved. what i am gratified is more people are voting now than they have in the past years. it is their obligation. to not let the country just happened. but create the country they want. that is why i tell people when they ask how you feel about the immigration law? how do you feel? because they generally have cases and i don't want to people to believe i made at my mind. i haven't prettify express an opinion that is what they will believe. but having said that, what i often say is why aren't you asking yourself? what you doing about it? if you thank you don't like something? that is what your country was founded on with your people getting up and starting a war to start a country i am not suggesting a rebellion. [laughter] far from that, please. but i am encouraging civic responsibility. w
's success. on education, the president of the united states has an opportunity to strengthen our classrooms and recommit to public education in this country, our teachers, so we can compete in a global market. now, for the republicans, they have vilified all of these institutions. they think that tax cuts for the wealthy and deregulation is exactly how we should run the country, and that's it. president obama actually accomplished a heck of a lot in his first term. but there is so much more he can do on a number of important issues facing our country in the second term. we are a center-left country. we are progressive. progressives are in the majority. we have to think like that as a movement. we have to think like that as a people. and the chatter across the street, we learned one thing about those folks during the 2012 election. they lie. they do a pretty good job of it. so when we start going down the road of immigration reform and climate change and fair taxation and public education, we'll get plenty of lies from the right, because they're damn good at it. but we have the majority on o
people, about 10% of total savings. then there is everything else, food, education, infrastructure, everything else the federal government does. ryan doesn't really say exactly which programs he is really cutting here. but it is where he is cutting. he gets four and a half times this budget as he does from medicare. it is about half the total cuts and it is a huge cut. we don't know the programs that will get the axe, but he has given us enough detail on it, to say that about two thirds of ryan's budget cuts comes from programs for the poor. but that is quite a bit. and he is still not balancing the budget until 2038. so how is ryan going to take the budget, which is already pretty rough and has pretty unpopular policies in it and get it to balance in ten years as opposed to 30? ironically, one thing that actually helps him a lot is the fiscal cliff deal, because it actually raises taxes. here is his explanation. >> all right, can you get to balance in ten years and not raise revenues? >> yes, yes, the revenue baseline is obviously higher now that we have this cliff behind us. >> i
. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the immigration law, how do you feel about the debate on the amendment and there are always questions like that would be called i generally have the cases i am still considering our that we have made up our mind because i haven't. but if i express an opinion, that is what they will believe. having said that what you can say to them is why are you asking me? why aren't you asking yourself? what do you think? and wh
, and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual, and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm bob arnety. it's gd to have you with us. resint oma ban his second term this week with pomp, circumstance, and some prayer. in longstanding american tradition, religion had a high profile in many inaugural activities. kim lawton has more. >> reporter: before monday's public swearing-in ceremony, the obamas attended a special worship service at st. john's episcopal church. protestant, catholic and jewish leaders were part of the service, which was closed to cameras. then, the public ceremony began with an invocation by myrlie evers-williams, widow of slain civil rights leader medgar evers and the first laywoman to give an inaugural prayer. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers, who taught us to pray, god, make me a blessing. >> reporter: music included the brooklyn tabernacle choir. >> the oath i have sworn before you today, like the one recited
, cutting educational programs. that's the one that balances in 2040. so what do you think a budget that balances in ten years from now is going to look like compared to that? obviously much worse. we're talking about cuts of up to 37% in government services as he know them, and, remember, you can't get a penny for these budgets from revenue. it all has to come from spending cuts, and the number i just cited takes social security, medicare, and defense off the table as they've stated. so we're talking about far deeper cuts than the ryan budget that you and i have bemoaned many a time here. >> so we're talking, okay, jared, about a 37% across the board cut. >> right. >> now, what was it about last year's election results that have led paul ryan to believe that he wasn't brutal enough the first time with the economy? >> exactly. this is the classical doubling down that i got to say at this point i am just -- maybe i should stop, but i'm just scratching my head over this. the election decisively was over this very argument about the role of government in people's lives. i actually thou
to try to educate our youth about the responsibility of using a firearm, the dangers of using a firearm? >> yeah. in a true way, to educate young people about both the responsibility and the true dangers, that's not a bad thing. what is a bad thing is blatantly marketing these guns to young people. basically it exposes the true colors of the gun lobby. they're not concerned in the gun industry. they're not concerned about the prevention of gun violence. they're just concerned about selling more guns. the rest of the american public wants to engage in a meaningful conversation about exactly what you're saying. what we can do respectful of the second amendment right to own guns, respectful of the fact that hunting and target shooting and protection are deeply ingrained notions. and, you know, in a lot of our country. but have that conversation simultaneous to the risks associated with having guns in the home and what we can do to prevent tragedies. >> sure. the tragedy that is most fresh on everyone's mind, newtown. right now there's a hearing under way in connecticut about stopping gun v
and it would be a tragedy if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and
finance over a period of years and her goal is to educate people so the great depression will never happen again. but it's very much in a buy of its time an idea we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills will all be okay. >> california senator dianne feinstein proposed legislation today that would then so-called assault weapons and ammunition magazines with more than 10 rounds. she was joined by other members of congress as well as police officers and mayors around the country. this is a little more than an hour. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i really want to welcome you. i am pleased to be joined this morning by a cross-section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today police chiefs, mayors, teachers,.yours, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and others who care deeply about the issue. i'd really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and in the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us have been working to provide violence for decades. t
you see problems or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. new honey bunches of oats greek yohere we go.ole grain. honey cornflakes and chunks of greek yogurt. i'm tasting both the yogurt and the honey at the same time. i'm like digging this yogurt thing. i feel healthy. new honey bunches of oats greek. >>> in your monday morning "pulse," another hollywood awards showy the booze flows pretty freely. >> and that makes for big laughs at last night's screen actors guild award, including one from a certain star of "modern family," explaining why she got into acting. >> i grew up in a very traditional catholic home. my father told me if i ever did anything artistic, i was going to look like a hooker. i told him, with this huge boobs that i inherited from your mother, i already look like a hooker. i am sofiaer ha vergara, and i actor. >>> the night's biggest buzz was about "argo." director and star, ben afleck, accepting
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
of us. they work across the aisle when possible and expand opportunity through education reform. i cannot wait to see what they can accomplish this year. when you take stock of all of this, it might seem you right now, but it will grow. as the president implement his agenda, it won't be pretty. at that moment, we will be ready. we will offer an alternative vision. we will explain how our vision differs and how it rests on vibrant communities and increases upward mobility. we will show how we can govern better by governing closer to the people and strengthening families and their livelihoods. we will make it clear that we have better ideas to combat poverty. our policies will lift everyone in this country. we will translate that vision into a governing agenda. that is how you offer enduring solutions. we will say to the country, here is our plan for the country, for the budget, for healthcare, for energy, defense. when we do that, we put our plans out against the president's results, i think we will compare quite favorably. we will win back the trust of the american people and put o
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
is expected to cover education funding upgrading the state's infrastructure. we are live from the state capitol. >> reporter: good morning. yes, today's state of the state will be a whole lot different than the state of the state address last year. remember that last year the governor was in a full court press all year to try to convince voters to approve a tax hike to deal with california's bumming. well, he successfully succeeded in doing that. so now his clout couldn't be lier and today we expect him to outline his vision on other issues beyond what last year was which was all about taxes and that's going to include as you said education, a big one. he is going to reveal a plan we expect that will offer more money and resources to poorer schools or those student who are more in need than others and also to address public universities to try to compel them to cut costs to students as well as making courses more prevalent online. infrastructure is another big one as he is expected to push for high speed rail and to talk act water issues and trying to build two massive tunnels to move w
to educate us. >> that was well-done. >> alex, you jump in here. parents will take risks with money knowing in the end even if they're not rich when they're old, they will have something so they spend all their money on tuition and raising kids. so i thought that was what he was talking about which is really important about our country. your thoughts, alex? >> i think one of the things that's been underdiscussed in terms of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of ira
it to come first, especially harry reid. it was so clear today there needs to be more education. there's no need for assault weapons, but when you saw what senator manchin went through in the town hall, saying do you think they're out to take your guns? and half the people thought, yes, this is not about taking away people's arms. this is about stopping assault weapons. so we need to do a little more education, and it's going to be a tough road for senate democrats to get through. >> it says a lot about information and providing the right context for this, joy ann, and as susan points out, the fact about the appetite not being there on the right. the fact is with harry reid, and he's a propro-gun, as well as j mansion. joe said on "morning joe" that we need to do something, and he's been the target of people coming at him pretty hard about those statements. where do you see this going from here? >> i think the nra is marginalizing itself daily with the statements they're making and probably making it easier for senate democrats to act. i spoke with a senior member of the house who said
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
, but you have an opportunity of society, education reform, economic growth, so that people can get on their feet and make the most of their lives and reach their potential. and that's what we're worried about losing in this country. >> one more on the budget. then a couple of other things. do you think there's a failure to get to know each other in washington, really get to know each other? you haven't had much contact with the president over the last couple of years. somebody pointed out to me something i thought was smart, which was solving the problem on the budget is not complicated. winning politically and solving the problem, that's hard. and that's what both sides seem to be locked into trying to do. >> well, i don't think that the president thinks we actually have a fiscal crisis. he's been reportedly saying to our leaders that we don't have a spending problem. we have a health care problem. that leads me to conclude he just thinks we ought to have more government-run health care and rationing. i don't think that's going to work. so there are a lot of democrats that are goo
, started megachurches, educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverly lehay who is a particular interest of mine in this book founded a group called conservative women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles; the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life. and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control, for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that, um, the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she's very -- she retired about almost 15 years ago now and lives, um, in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her. and one of the things that i think is really important is t
our borders to people who have all sorts of education and skills and providing a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people. that, to me, is one of the first signs that substantively the republican party is taking to heart what you're talking about. >> it's also, though, it's the theatrics of it all, and sarah palin was more theatrics than anything else. doing stupid things and saying stupid things politically, going on facebook after gabby giffords was shot, talking about blood libel, one mistake after another. >> it wasn't just that one line. >> there were, willie geist, so many republicans that really did believe -- and i told them they were dead wrong -- they really believed the benghazi hearings, and i heard this when they were getting sworn in, saying benghazi is going to be the issue where we're really going to get the country to turn on barack obama and hillary clinton. hillary clinton killed them. and once again, a self-inflicted wound. you had a senator going out saying oh, she was just faking her tears. >> oh, my god. >> and we do that time and time and t
states, you have to do education and you got to do treatment, because what we have is just a revolving circle of demand and we are not alone. europe is a huge demand, russia now increasing demand. cocaine routes and marijuana routes are not just coming up from colombia and other countries and latin america and the caribbean up to here, but going across the atlantic and going to other countries and comes from asia. it is pandemic. so i think we need a more comprehensive approach, one where it is less finger pointing and you work cooperatively to understand everybody's role in trying to do something about it. i have always felt that this label of war on drugs, is kind of artificial, because war implies is it's all out and you have to win. and i don't think it's all been out. and principally because we have failed to do our part in education, and abstinence. we have to engage ourselves and that would help establish credibility and viability with other countries. >> thank you very much for those answers. >> senator paul. >> senator kerry, thanks for coming today and your testimony. i agree
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)